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Saturday, 02 August 2014 07:33

Eggman Holds Roundtable with Female Business Owners, Educators, Community Leaders

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Eggman Holds Roundtable with Female Business Owners, Educators, Community Leaders Courtesy of Michael Eggman
Wednesday, Michael Eggman (D) candidate for the 10th Congressional District, held a women's economic roundtable in Modesto that included female business owners, educators, and local community leaders.

"As the father of two daughters and brother of two sisters, I look forward to being a voice for women in Congress," said Eggman. "I know that when women succeed, our valley's and our country's economy thrives."

At the roundtable, Eggman spoke with participants about discrimination they have faced in the past and what Congress can do to put local women on equal footing.

As the Democratic nominee, Eggman directly endorsed immediate actions like the Paycheck Fairness Act, that is meant to help ensure women get equal pay for equal work as well as raise the minimum wage.

The Paycheck Fairness Act amends the portion of the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 known as the Equal Pay Act to revise exceptions to prohibitions against sex discrimination in the payment of wages.

It revises the exception to the prohibition for a wage rate differential based on any other factor other than sex, and limits such factors to bona fide factors, such as education, training, or experience.

The legislation was introduced in January 2009 and most recently updated Jan. 23, 2013 when it was introduced to Senate. Since 2009, the act has seen multiple filibusters and on April 1, at the hands of Republicans, was again voted down. At the time, Republicans attributed their voting down of the act to the fact that it was redundant legislation, but Democrats still are pushing for the act to decrease the pay inequalities between women and men. California Senators Barbara Boxer and Dianne Feinstein are both cosponsors of the bill.

Earlier in the week, Eggman was endorsed by Planned Parenthood because of his advocacy plans for women's health. He believes that when women receive adequate family planning options, they are better able to hold down well-paying jobs, start new businesses, and succeed economically.

Comments (1)

  1. MaleMatters

Here's why Republicans voted against the act:

"...[O]nly 35 percent of women who have earned MBAs after getting a bachelor’s degree from a top school are working full time." It "is not surprising that women are not showing up more often in...

Here's why Republicans voted against the act:

"...[O]nly 35 percent of women who have earned MBAs after getting a bachelor’s degree from a top school are working full time." It "is not surprising that women are not showing up more often in corporations’ top ranks." http://malemattersusa.wordpress.com/2014/04/25/why-women-are-leaving-the-workforce-in-record-numbers/

“In 2011, 22% of male physicians and 44% of female physicians worked less than full time, up from 7% of men and 29% of women from Cejka’s 2005 survey.” http://ama-assn.org/amednews/2012/03/26/bil10326.htm (See also "Female Docs See Fewer Patients, Earn $55,000 Less Than Men" http://finance.yahoo.com/news/female-docs-see-fewer-patients-172100718.html)

A thousand laws won't close those gaps.

In fact, no law yet has closed the gender wage gap — not the 1963 Equal Pay for Equal Work Act, not Title VII of the 1964 Civil Rights Act, not the 1978 Pregnancy Discrimination Act, not affirmative action (which has benefited mostly white women, the group most vocal about the wage gap - http://tinyurl.com/74cooen), not the 1991 amendments to Title VII, not the 1991 Glass Ceiling Commission created by the Civil Rights Act, not the 1993 Family and Medical Leave Act, not the Age Discrimination in Employment Act, not the Americans with Disability Act (Title I), not diversity, not the countless state and local laws and regulations, not the thousands of company mentors for women, not the horde of overseers at the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, not TV's and movies' last two decades of casting women as thoroughly integrated into the world of work (while making the huge, sexist mistake of rarely casting men as integrated into the world of children: http://malemattersusa.wordpress.com/2012/02/12/in-movies-dads-not-treated-as-equals-to-moms/), not the Ledbetter Fair Pay Act, and not the Paycheck Fairness Act.

That's because women's pay-equity advocates, who always insist one more law is needed, continue to overlook the effects of female AND male behavior:

See: "Does the Ledbetter Act Help Women?" http://malemattersusa.wordpress.com/2011/12/03/will-the-ledbetter-fair-pay-act-help-women/

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0 #1 MaleMatters 2014-08-03 06:14
Here's why Republicans voted against the act:

"...[O]nly 35 percent of women who have earned MBAs after getting a bachelor’s degree from a top school are working full time." It "is not surprising that women are not showing up more often in corporations’ top ranks." http://malemattersusa.wordpress.com/2014/04/25/why-women-are-leaving-the-workforce-in-record-numbers/

“In 2011, 22% of male physicians and 44% of female physicians worked less than full time, up from 7% of men and 29% of women from Cejka’s 2005 survey.” ama-assn.org/amednews/2012/03/26/bil10326.htm (See also "Female Docs See Fewer Patients, Earn $55,000 Less Than Men" http://finance.yahoo.com/news/female-docs-see-fewer-patients-172100718.html)

A thousand laws won't close those gaps.

In fact, no law yet has closed the gender wage gap — not the 1963 Equal Pay for Equal Work Act, not Title VII of the 1964 Civil Rights Act, not the 1978 Pregnancy Discrimination Act, not affirmative action (which has benefited mostly white women, the group most vocal about the wage gap - tinyurl.com/74cooen), not the 1991 amendments to Title VII, not the 1991 Glass Ceiling Commission created by the Civil Rights Act, not the 1993 Family and Medical Leave Act, not the Age Discrimination in Employment Act, not the Americans with Disability Act (Title I), not diversity, not the countless state and local laws and regulations, not the thousands of company mentors for women, not the horde of overseers at the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, not TV's and movies' last two decades of casting women as thoroughly integrated into the world of work (while making the huge, sexist mistake of rarely casting men as integrated into the world of children: malemattersusa.wordpress.com/2012/02/12/in-movies- dads-not-treated-as-equals-to-moms/), not the Ledbetter Fair Pay Act, and not the Paycheck Fairness Act.

That's because women's pay-equity advocates, who always insist one more law is needed, continue to overlook the effects of female AND male behavior:

See: "Does the Ledbetter Act Help Women?" malemattersusa.wordpress.com/2011/12/03/will-the-l edbetter-fair-pay-act-help-women/
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